#TEDxSlottsparken är till ända!

Vilken dag!
#TEDxSlottsparken är nu lagd till handlingarna, jag kan sätta moderator TEDx på CVt och inte minst har jag fyllt på minnesbanken med en händelserik dag som sannerligen kommer hänga med mig för livet.

Med Oksana, Andrea och Pernilla under TEDxSlottsparken.

Vilken glädje att ha en handfull vänner i rummet; vetskapen att ytterligare andra följde med i livestreamen värmde än mer. Att få lov att lyssna till tolv fantastiska talare i elva inspirerande tal, och därtil fyra TED Talks (två hade jag valt – Richard St John och Phil Hansen som jag bloggade om redan 2013 -, två var nya för mig – Carson Bruns och Tomas Chamurro-Premuzic). Att få en möjlighet att reflektera, dela, inspirerar och förtydliga i relation till dagens tema (transformation) såväl som till vad de fantastiska talarna väckte för funderingar hos och i mig.

All värme, kärlek och uppskattning som strömmat min väg inför/under/efter dagens event fyller mig till hjärta och själ, likväl som all värme, kärlek och uppskattning som flödat ur mig till alla som varit del av dagen, talare som volontärer, biblioteksanställda som TEDx-organisatörerna, sponsorer som deltagare också gör det. Dubbeluppfylld, på det allra mest fantastiska av vis! Det här skulle jag inte vilja ha ogjort för allt smör i Småland (blandar jag metaforer nu igen måntro?).

Efter eventet drog jag ner till nakenbryggan för ett dopp – oh ljuva hav! – innan jag cyklade hem, där jag trodde jag skulle kraschlanda i soffan för att vlogga och blogga och sen göra en tidig kväll… gick sådär. Men nu, efter (ännu) en sömnlös natt (tredje på nio nätter) och en låååång dag, ska jag äntligen krypa till sängs.

 

Podcast 26/52 – on lies

The TED Radio hour from NPR is great. I haven’t listened to the show for a while but figured it was time to provide a new flavor in my podcast recommendations.

I love TED Talks, and have done for a long time. I’ve been watching them for years and years, and almost wonder if it can be as long as it seems, more than 8 years, I know that for a fact. And I also love getting a bit more depth to a TED Talk, and that’s what the TED Radio hour provides me with.

BoldomaticPost_Lying-is-a-cooperative-act-ThThe TED Radio hour on lies is very interesting to listen to. And interestingly enough, although I am a big fan of TED Talks, here’s a collection of five talks that were all new to me! They all center on understanding various aspects of why we lie, and I had more than one aha-moment while listening.

For instance the realization that lying is a cooperative act. Now. I know I live in the experience of my thinking, but I just never really zoomed in with that understanding to the concept of lying before. So yeah, of course the power of a lie comes with someone believing it.

That makes it really interesting though – am I sometimes more likely to believe a lie than not? Surely. Are there people who’s lies I tend to believe more often than others? I would think so. And when am I more prone to lying than not? What are the factors behind my own lies?

Head count or heart count?

Talked to a client about leadership, and was reminded of this TED Talk by Simon Sinek:

I have a feeling that leadership today isn’t about asserting my will, fighting to get everyone onboard my ship, but rather to harness the strength and potential of all in my surroundings, to achieve something that also will benefit the world in a broader sense.

Achievement for your company, at the cost of others, isn’t sustainable, and I would argue that it’s not beneficial for anyone, really. Achievement for me at the cost of you, I believe is harmful. To us both. Because when we step on somebody else to get to the top, we are hurting ourselves at the same time, because we are connected.

I look forward to the day when I see more and more proof of the circle of trust that Simon talks about, the one where we count hearts rather than heads. I can actively participate in creating this future. And so can you. How? You tell me! What can you do today to take a step towards this future?

Listen!

Cecilia von Melen sent #skolvåren a link to a TED Talk by Julian Treasure, on five ways to listen better. Cecilia caught on to the idea Julian have that listening should be taught in schools.

It’s a challenge alright, to break the path of less and less listening that we seem to be on, but surely it’s a sound challenge to take on?

Embrace the shake!

Thank you Alan Seale for this great TED:

What an amazing story, providing profound insights into life. The ability to learn to embrace the shake (watch and you’ll find out exactly what this means!) is in a sense, an example of taking control of your own life. Phil Hansen truly embraces his limitation as an artist, and in doing so, realized the world is limitless.

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He continues to state:

What I thought would be the ultimate limitation actually turned out to be the ultimate liberation.

Have you embraced your limitations?

Stroke of insight

Have you watched Jill Bolte Taylor‘s TED Talk about her stroke of insight (and she really means stroke)?

It’s a favorite of mine, and I strongly recommend it:

However, what I recommend even more is that you get a hold of a copy of her book My stroke of insight. In the book Jill describes what she discovered before/during/after she got her stroke. Since she’s a neuroanatomist she studies the brain. Her personal experience of having a massive stroke, coupled with her expertize of the brain makes for a very interesting book.

The thing I took with me from the book is her sensations of being one, and being everything. But you’ll simply have to read it to understand what I mean!

Have you experienced getting an insight that rocks your entire world?