Podcast 39/52 – Chickensoup for the soul

Thursday to Sunday have been a long enjoyable chickensoup for the soul-moment for me, as I’ve been travelling in England with my choir. England have greeted us with the most magnificent fall weather, and we’ve taken in the sights, sounds and smells of Oxford and its surroundings. On Saturday we sang in Enstone parish church of St Kenelm’s, and it was a joy. Good accoustics and an attentive audience, including both a touch of royalty (as the Swedish princess Margareta attended, being a resident of Enstone) as well as one sweet soul who let out the most appreciative ahhh at the end of each song. (And no, it wasn’t someone in pain, trust me, I know the difference!)On Sunday (today that is) we will sing in the service at 11 am in St Paul’s chuch in Covent Garden, also known as the actor’s church, as well as give a repeat concert at 1 pm.On account of all this music, as podcast tip 39/52, I wanted to share a special episode of On Being with you, the one featuring Yo-Yo Ma, world-reknown cellist. And, as it turned out, an extremely interesting human being, with such a great knowing of why he does what he does. 

I’ve listened to this episode, both the edited as well as the uncut version, many times, and each time I am left with the most lovely sensation of deep inner calm coupled with a great appreciation for the wisdom available to us all. Yo-Yo Ma personifies this for me, and I hope you will take the time to listen. And don’t be fooled by all this talk of music, it’s definitely a conversation spanning a wide array of life, including music, but really centering on Yo-Yo Ma’s love and interest of humanity.

Music is what happens in between the notes, Yo-Yo Ma says, and I can only agree. In between the notes, my soul is restored, my mind can take leaps of joy as well as sorrow, and it is truly chickensoup for the soul. For me, listen to, or creating, music is definitely one of my favorite pastimes to sooth as well as vigorate my soul. What’s the best chickensoup for your soul?  

Podcast 21/52 – Failure is your friend

I’ve had a lot of thoughts and conversations centered around the concept of failures, what it is, what it isn’t, why it affects us so much, and how we should look at it in order not to let fear of failure paralyze us. Hence, when I stumbled upon a new (for me) podcast, Freakonomics Radio, featuring an episode entitled Failure is your friend, they had me hooked already.

BoldomaticPost_The-quicker-you-fail-the-moreI haven’t even read the Freakonomics books, but I think there’s one in the book shelf upstairs. After having listened to this episode and one more, I’m definitely picking up the books as well. Because I really like this. They had a fun and kindhearted questioning take on the subject, and seem to be like that overall, which I find very refreshing.

So, not only do I here give you a new podcast, which makes me very happy, since I’ve been a bit introverted lately, listening to the same-old-same-old, but also a subject that I really care a lot for. I also give you an episode which I think is a valuable listen for most everyone.

The fear of failure can be paralyzing, and it has certainly affected me (more in the past than now, luckily!) and many I see around me as well. And I have yet to see that fear of failure serve individuals or humanity at large. On the contrary, many are the things without which our society would not be the same, that are a direct result of people failing well, failing fast, and failing productively.

Are you served by how you relate to failure?

Listen for the unknown #4

Why not stay where we left of with #3 yesterday with On being? Here’s another podcast from the same show, or actually, it’s old enough to be from Speaking of faith, which is what On being was called before. It’s been a few years since I first heard this specific podcast, and it’s remained with me since then. I just relistened to it and it’s as rich and rewarding today, as it was first time I listened to it. I remembered it to be called Being autistic, being human, but it turns out the episode is called Autism and humanity.

prepared to lose

What do you hear that you’ve never heard before?

What’s my legacy?

Am attending a two day Independence intensive with Rich Litvin and Steve Chandler and we are asked to play the deathbed game by answering two questions:

What’s my legacy? What contribution do I want to make in the world?

We get a 5 min reflection time, to ponder these questions and our own mortality. Meanwhile Allison Crow is the visual recorder at the event and she’s capturing the deathbed game this way:

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I pick up my phone and start to write an email to myself. My mind immediately wanders towards the Swedish movement the school spring, aka #skolvåren, that I am one of the initiators of, and which for me is a conduit for one of the great passions of my life: the set goal I have to change school systems globally by 2020.

But what lies behind that, what’s the passion driving me? Why do I want to do this?

Well, in short because I see so much wasted and untapped potential just withering and shrivelling away, going unused, perishing. And that’s to the detriment of us all, I tell you. We have challenges today and tomorrow that require something else from humanity than what created the problems now challenging us. And to paraphrase Albert Einstein, you cannot solve a problem from within the same state of mind that created it in the first place.

So, I want more of us (all of us!) to level up. To climb up the ladder of consciousness, to a higher level. That’s what I see is in store for us, for humanity. We have but one way forward if we want to remain here on Earth and that is to level up. There is no doubt in my mind on that one.

I want a world inhabited by people who are consciously creating the world, rather than just reacting to what happens. And that’s why I want to change school systems on a global scale – because in today’s modern society school has a HUGE impact on all of out lives. So we need to make sure it’s an impact for the better, for the good of humanity, for the lives of the born and the unborn.

In short, that’s my contribution to the world.

What’s your legacy?