10/24 – Disruption will come

disruption

Don’t have a clue as to what industry Seth was actually asked about. But his answer is almost brutally straightforward, and, in my view, spot on. The question is, have you grasped this? The fact that your industry will be disrupted, I mean? Cuz it will, for sure.

We’ve seen it with the record industry, publishing, news papers, phone companies, hotels and taxi’s. Your industry is next. You won’t know when, but disruption will come.

So – how to face the disruption of an industry, without letting it engulf you as an individual?

Reflection #10 of 24 from the notes I took and the experience I had at the Seth Godin Q&A-session in London, November 2015. These reflections will constitute my Advent Calendar for 2015, and will be posted daily from December 1st to the 24th.

4/24 – The urge to hide

I don’t even remember the question that led up to this:dolphin

”Oh no, not me, what should I say? What should I do? Do I look good? Is my hair ok? Who will see this, and what will they think of me?”

All those can be read into that ”Eh…” in the note I took.

In other words – human beings have a tendency to worry about what others might think, rather than just be in the moment, and go with what wants to happen.

Why is that? Where does it come from? And when does it come? Because surely we are not born with a detrimental and depressingly downputting self-deprecating inner dialogue?  One that we actually don’t have to listen to even, and still, it’s as if we think it’s telling the Truth. Why is that?

Reflection #4 of 24 from the notes I took and the experience I had at the Seth Godin Q&A-session in London, November 2015. These reflections will constitute my Advent Calendar for 2015, and will be posted daily from December 1st to the 24th.

3/24 – How do I do Trust?

One of the things that have really impressed me with Seth Godin is how he uses one element to navigate his work (and I presume life) by: Trust.

I remember listening to him in a podcast saying he determines what to do or not, by asking a simple question of himself: Does this scale trust? 
If the answer is Yes, he goes ahead. If No, he moves on to the next thing.trustSo when asked something akin to ”What will be the divider between those who make it and those who don’t, in the coming years?” he replied Trust and Attention. That is what will determine what we see, hear, shop, eat, where we work, the clothes we wear and so on in the decades ahead.

Now. I understand what he means with Trust, or so I believe at least. The level of trust I hold for someone, something, depend upon what they do, how they do it, and or me, why they do it in the first place. If there is coherence there, and it fits in with the way I show up in the world, I will trust.

But what does he mean with Attention?

Is it this: Those who works out a way to get attention from the masses, will be makers and shakers ahead regardless of what the product is? Somehow I don’t think so.

Might it be this then: Those who knows how to scale trust, and has a great product (a physical or digital object, a service, whatever your thing is) to put out into the world, will attract the attention of those who vibrate on the same frequency?

Or this: That which I put attention on is what I will see more of in the future?

Or something completely different?
I don’t know. What’s your take on it?

Reflection #3 of 24 from the notes I took and the experience I had at the Seth Godin Q&A-session in London, November 2015. These reflections will constitute my Advent Calendar for 2015, and will be posted daily from December 1st to the 24th.

2/24 – Love those bad ideas!

Seth Godin was asked how he manages to publish such great content on his blog, daily, without fail. His answer, short and sweet, was to come up with a lot of bad ideas.Note one #sethinlondon

What the world gets to see on his blog, is the result of a ruthless culling. Seth told us he writes ten to fifteen rudimentary blog posts a day, fine tunes three to four, and finally decided which is the best. That’s the one we, as his readers, get to see.

This chocked me. And from what I heard of my fellow participants at #SethinLondon, this was one of the things that really stood out for a lot of us.

I mean. I’ve set my sights on blogging daily, and I do, more or less. Have been doing it for soon to be three years now. But I’m still at that stage where I’m happy that I write one post. I mean, sometimes I do write more than one post, but rather than cull them from possible posts to publish on account of not being good enough, I save them for a day when my inspiration is lacking. Which means, you lot aren’t as lucky as the blog readers of Seth Godin are. His readers know what he publishes has been through a quality check, of sorts. My posts, very little quality control in my blogging process, I have to confess. I write, and then I publish. Seldom do I throw it away, thinking it’s not good enough to publish. But perhaps I should start to question my postings a bit more?

Oh well. I’m not putting myself and my blogging down though. I do learn. A lot. I mean, my writing is improving, based on this aim of mine to blog daily. But since I’m actually starting a new blog, solely in English, come the new year, perhaps I should set a higher standard with a lower frequency for that blog? Blogging three times per week, making sure what get’s published is up to the mark?

Reflection #2 of 24 from the notes I took and the experience I had at the Seth Godin Q&A-session in London, November 2015. These reflections will constitute my Advent Calendar for 2015, and will be posted daily from December 1st to the 24th.

1/24 – Merely begin.

Where do I start?
How do I know what is the right project, work, next step for me?
How do I know?begin

That was the gist of one of the questions asked of Seth Godin at #SethInLondon. And Seth beautifully answers:

Begin. 
Merely begin. 

It doesn’t matter what you pick, as long as you pick. That is the clinch, you see! Picking. Not what you pick. But the act of picking and then taking step one, step two, step three, and so on, putting your effort into whatever it is you picked.

I think as you get used to picking, you also get better at it, learning from previous picks that might have totally bombed, or just didn’t really feel right after a while. As long as you keep on picking and continue to move, to act, to do work that matters, stuff may or may not be smashing successes or total disasters. Keep on picking. And then. Most importantly: You begin.

Reflection #1 of 24 from the notes I took and the experience I had at the Seth Godin Q&A-session in London, November 2015. These reflections will constitute my Advent Calendar for 2015, and will be posted daily from December 1st to the 24th.